Is the Perfect Lesson Possible?

Every teacher will tell you that they would love to teach a perfect lesson each time they step in front of a class. We know that is not possible on a regular basis, maybe only on a rare occasion. We do try to produce a perfect lesson so that we can help our students develop fully.

We may think we have finally achieved what we might describe as a perfect lesson only to find out from the reaction of our students that they don’t see it that way. It falls short of their personal ideal.

When you have created your perfect lesson, the students don’t think so. When you think you failed to produce the perfect/good lesson, the class thinks otherwise. But they don’t let you become aware of that.

What factors that deem a lesson is perfect for the teacher may be completely the opposite to what students feel is a perfect lesson.

Now, let me detail what a perfect lesson might consist of for the classroom teacher.

The introduction gets the students interested and absorbed in the content. Their eyes are on you the whole time.

Your presentation is smooth and the lesson proceeds as planned.

The students asked questions that are appropriate; at the right time and indicate they are thinking deeply about what you are teaching. The questions help deepen the students’ understanding of the topic. Your students don’t hesitate to ask questions and follow-up questions if they need further clarification.

When you set follow-up activities, they begin work immediately with enthusiasm.

The final nail for a perfect lesson comes when you assess your class’ grasp of the topic. If the results show a greater understanding by the students than is expected or normal, then you might regard the lesson as a perfect success.

The above scenario is sought after but is a rarely attained achievement. There are too many factors that work to prevent this outcome. Here are just a few.

There are many different learning styles in any class. It is nigh impossible to teach a lesson that incorporates strategies that appeal to each learning style.

Secondly, we are teaching young human beings who have all faults of the human race. They may have come to school hungry; or had a fight with mum or a friend. They may be sick or tired from lack of sleep. There may have been a family break up or the death of a close relative or friend.

As much as we try to avoid it, there will always be interruptions during lessons caused by outside influences.

The time of the day often interferes with students’ concentration. Hot afternoons create tiredness. Lessons after breaks from class often need time to settle students down. Teachers need to pick the best type of pedagogue to fit the prevailing climate in and out of the classroom.

Then, there might be some underlying tension among and between students in the class that distracts them from the core business of the learning.

Lastly, we must not forget the teacher in all of this. Are you feeling well? Do you have problems at home? Do you feel ready to teach a new topic? I could go on to suggest other factors that would influence your ability to teach that perfect lesson. Every teacher knows what impinges personally on their ability to teach the perfect lesson

The reality is it is not possible. What we do is to acknowledge that personally and deliver the best lesson we can every time despite the circumstances. There will always be certain pedagogue that we do well and other types that are a work in progress. The best thing for our students is to use as many types of pedagogue as we can to cater for the different learning styles of our students. That way we shall get the best learning outcomes.

Our author, a secondary teacher of over forty years, often advised many trainee and new teachers especially during his years as head of Mathematics Department. He has written many books on teaching at the chalk face. These are available by emailing rickboyce@bigpond.com for further information. He has also written books on his two passions, Australian Football and Public Speaking. This web sit contains over 250 articles he wrote on a wide variety of topics.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Richard_D_Boyce/1265534

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/10383551

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Post